Ascend Publications

Ascend is pleased to offer these resources to the growing two-generation field. We kindly request that you attribute Ascend’s work by citing the publication referenced. Please email ascend.info@aspeninstitute.org with any questions. Thank you!

Parents who want to improve their economic opportunity through education often encounter scheduling conflicts, child care challenges, and other major obstacles that high-quality, non-degree programs can help them overcome. Access to more flexible pathways creates opportunities for parents to develop the skills needed to participate in the workforce and obtain economic security while recognizing and respecting their role as parents.

Principles and Innovations Report

This report from the Aspen Family Prosperity Innovation Community shares: principles and solutions that can advance the economic success and well-being of children and families; highlights insights and solutions coming out of Family Prosperity; and shares innovative approaches being used by employers and implemented through local, state, and federal policy.

Bold Ideas for Families

This two-pager highlights principles and solutions from two Aspen Family Prosperity Innovation Community publications: the Principles and Innovations to Drive Family Prosperity report, and Aspen Family Prosperity Innovation Community Index.

The Aspen Postsecondary Success for Parents (PSP) Initiative is a partnership with Imaginable Futures and the ECMC Foundation to raise awareness about and share recommendations to better support students who are parents. The PSP Initiative is informed by three groups of experts from across the United States: Parent Advisors, National Advisors, and the Postsecondary Leadership Circle for Parents. Learn about each member of these dynamic advisory groups and how they are contributing to student parent success.

This brief highlights innovative ideas for improving access to family supports and services, blending and braiding national and state-level funding sources to promote a coherent statewide focus on early childhood, and addressing ongoing challenges surrounding data collection and governance. More than ideas, the strategies presented here are real examples of systems and programs that are already working in some states and can be adapted and replicated elsewhere.

This brief shares insights from the conversation that offer space to consider changes needed in workforce development policies and practices to be more supportive of parents. By sharing these perspectives, Ascend hopes other practitioners, policymakers, and researchers will use these ideas to identify and address similar gaps in their own efforts.