Two generations. One future.

Ascend at the Aspen Institute is the hub for breakthrough ideas and collaborations that move children and their parents toward educational success and economic security.

Two Open Windows: Infant and Parent Neurologic Change

Two Open Windows: Infant and Parent Neurologic Change Download today!next

Smart Starts for Children and Families

Building Upon Early Learning Innovations May 13-14, Washington, DC. Learn Morenext

Reimagining 2Gen Pathways: Bold Ideas for 2015

10 Bold Ideas being digitally released beginning April 20, 2015 See the first six #2genOpps herenext

2gen experts discussion - Anthology

Gain insights into social capital, early childhood & workforce - and download the new 2gen Anthology! Download the Anthologynext

Ascend Fellows 2015

Announcing the 2015 Class of Ascend Fellows View the classnext

Top Ten for 2Gen

Ascend releases new two-generation policy agenda Get the reportnext

Colorado and Washington Metro Region: Momentum on our Doorsteps

Where the mountains meet the Hill Colorado and Washington Metro Region #2gen Blognext

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Aspen Institute Ascend Network

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Action and Learning Partners:

Leading organizations and experts working to create a portfolio of two-generation solutions through practice, policy, evidence building, and political will. More next

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Ascend Fellows:

Diverse leaders ready to make a quantum leap forward in building pathways to opportunity for low-income children and their parentsMore next

Ascend Media

Voices and Stories:

Multimedia perspectives from families and leaders in the fieldMore next

In the NewsSee allnext

Research shows stress can be toxic for kids who live in poverty

When you hear stories about poverty, they’re usually not focused on how a person's brain deals with stress. But there's growing scientific evidence that experiences like homelessness or living in a dangerous neighborhood actually changes the brains of young children. Without intervention, these experiences can have profound consequences later in life. morenext

From Colorado Public Radio, May 21, 2015

Poverty, family stress are thwarting student success, top teachers say

The greatest barriers to school success for K-12 students have little to do with anything that goes on in the classroom, according to the nation’s top teachers: It is family stress, followed by poverty, and learning and psychological problems. morenext

From The Washington Post, May 19, 2015

Smart Social Programs

We cannot solve poverty or lack of mobility overnight, but contrary to what the skeptics say, investing in families works — not just for them, but for all of us. morenext

From The New York Times: Op-Ed, May 11, 2015

American Innovation Can Narrow the Opportunity Gap for Kids

One promising approach taking hold across the country is called the 2Gen framework that structures programs to include children and their parents at the same time, tying economic and educational success to a widening of social networks and skills. morenext

From The Huffington Post | Blog, May 06, 2015

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