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Who’s Missing From This Picture? Single Parent Students


As higher education advocates (and morning show devotees), it was reassuring to watch news anchors embrace the “Back to College” cycle in recent weeks, discussing various issues of concern: the myriad of potentially distracting course offerings and extracurricular activities, the question of what a degree will be worth, and the cost of college. The estimated…

Mississippi Rising: Building Two-Generation Solutions


In the summer of 1967, Senator Robert Kennedy embarked on a historic trip to the Mississippi Delta to see whether the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 was making a difference in the lives of poor Americans. At the time of Kennedy’s visit, Mississippi had one of the highest poverty rates in the country. Despite the…

Building An Early Learning Nation, Two Generations at a Time


When my husband, Mike, and I started the Bezos Family Foundation in 2000, we did so with a bold set of beliefs: the loss of potential plus the loss of opportunity equals a “lost generation.” We believe education – particularly early childhood education – is a silver bullet, one that ensures the potential of children…

Fueling Family Ambition


  Follow @FUEL_Education Tinea Rochelle works a full time job while raising two kids: Malik, 19, and Keleyia, 12. They live in Hyde Park, an urban community in Boston.  Tinea never attended college herself; she secured a job at John Hancock straight out of high school. But she knows that her children face a different…

Carrying on the Two-Generation Drumbeat


During my internship with Ascend at the Aspen Institute, I learned something ingrained within me throughout childhood has become an important approach to moving families toward opportunity. Now I step back and wonder how I didn’t originally recognize it as something unique and special during my upbringing.  Ascend at the Aspen Institute focuses on two-generation…

A College Savings Account for Every Child


[It’s less about the fullness of the cup and more about just having a cup. A study finds that students who save between $1 and $500 for college are four times more likely to graduate than students with no savings at all. An article in the National Journal (shared below with permission), A College Savings…